Two Great Words: The End by Jules Dixon @JulesofTripleR #MondayMessages #WriterTips

Two Great Words: The End

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So for the last two weeks I’ve been talking about the Three Act Structure. We’ve visited the beginning of a story (aka Act 1 or the excitement of meeting characters and finding out their goals, motivations, and conflicts) and the middle (aka Act 2 where we take those conflicts and we make them even worse).

So now, we’re at the end.

The End.

Those are two words authors dream of typing and when it comes down to it, nothing ever feels better.

So once a writer has taken their characters to rock bottom and had the worst of the worst happen, they’ve broken up, shit has hit the fan, everything looks like it can’t ever be fixed, and the readers are wondering: How in the world are they going to get back together? This is Act III. 

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The resolution to the story.

In the conclusion, readers must find closure. The main characters in romance will always end up together, either in a happily-ever-after or happily-for-now. And while we do this, an author must still maintain the same emotion that they have built throughout the story. Pulling those heart strings of the reader.  

For instance, in one of my stories, Rest, My Love, the black moment comes when Rahl, the leading man’s PTSD comes to a head and when he finds the leading lady, Sage, in the arms of another man comforting her. He punches the man and Sage has to make the hard decision to end their relationship for his sake as he needs to concentrate on getting better.

Rest, My Love Excerpt: 

“Sage…” Rahl stepped toward me and reached out.

I stepped back and the rain dribbled down my cheek, like tears but colder. “No. I just came out here to tell you that we need to take a break, Rahl. I need a break from us.”

“You don’t mean that. You’re my angel. We were brought together to save—”

“Each other? It seems like I’m trying to save someone who doesn’t want to be saved. I’m getting sucked into your vortex of guilt and anger and I can’t handle it. I just started to love life again.” I stared into those eyes that melted a part of my heart. “Because of you.” My bottom lip tingled with the want to kiss him, but I fought giving in. “But you’re taking that away from me.”

“I love you, Sage.”

My body shuddered, some from the cold rain and some from struggling not to give in, but I needed to be strong. “I know you love me. From the moment you said it, I never doubted that fact.”

“Then can we just forget what happened?”

I didn’t want to forget, I wanted him to remember, to remember that his actions hurt people, and I couldn’t stand by and watch him crumble and take me down with him.

“No. I can’t forget. Just like you can’t forget the things that have happened to you and the things you know about Easton, and the darkness that is eating you from the inside out and the memories and fears that cloud your judgment.” I hiccupped a sob. “I forgive you for everything, but there are other people you need to atone to, including yourself. I don’t want to be another person to get caught in one of your explosions of impulsive emotion.”

“I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to hit you, but he had his hands on you.”

“No, you didn’t mean to hit me, but if you hadn’t gone straight to violence and let me talk to you, you would have found out that Ollie and I are…” I swallowed as I stared into the eyes that melted my willpower. I looked away.

Maybe it would be easier for him to think the worst? If there is a time to be a good liar, it is now.

I stood straight. “You would’ve found out that Ollie and I are starting a relationship and you and I … we are finished.”

Rahl’s face paled. “You’re lying. You told me he was nothing.”

I mumbled, “I pray you get better, Rahl,” and tried to skirt past him.

He moved in front of me. “No, I don’t accept it. I don’t know why you’re lying to me but I’ll find out.” His hand ran down my arm to my wrist and he brought it to his mouth for a gentle kiss. “You’re killing me, Sage.”

Water droplets showered me as I shook my head. “No, Rahl. You’re killing yourself.”

Now, I could’ve done many things to bring them back together, but in the end, I had to torture them a little while longer while they were apart and give the reader more reasons for wanting them to come back together. I’m not going to tell you what I did, but it showed how much they were meant to be together, so when they actually ended up in the same room and Rahl was all better, the lightning bolts flew between them like they were two thunderstorms colliding, and when the storm was over, everything was good again, and then I had one more chapter to finish up all the tiny loose ends.

And their love is true, beautiful, and the real deal.

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When an author really comes to the end, the last sentences can make or break the novel. That final moment needs to remind the reader of something important, a repeated theme or a special element between the two characters. A final piece of the puzzle to make the reader go–YES!  

In Rest, My Love, I bring back something that Sage said to Rahl in the first chapter. So Sage says: 

I hadn’t forgotten my past, but I lived for the future and Rahl had decided to do the same.

And together we would create the sweet music of love for the rest of our lives.

Only you, Rahl. Only … you.

So the end can make or break a novel. Make sure yours gives the reader what they want, but not always exactly as they want. A surprise is always a good thing. 

Okay, until next Monday.

Hugs and ❤ Jules

GIFs from http://www.giphy.com. 

Crutch Words: Freaky Friday with Michelle Roth @mroth_author

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When you’ve gotten your manuscript completed and you’ve got your shiny new contract in hand, the work is just beginning. You’ve got at least a couple rounds of edits headed your way. And, that’s a good thing.

Editors are trained to look for the standard pratfalls. Bad spelling, poor punctuation, cohesive story structure, and the like. One of the less obvious things they’ll look for?  Crutch words.

It’s that word or phrase we tack unnecessarily on to a sentence that gives us more time to think of what we’re going to say next. Like. Actually. Literally. Truthfully. Very. Honestly. Seriously. To be fair. Seems.

These phrases add absolutely no value.

While they may happen in a character’s dialog, they most likely don’t happen in their narrative and they shouldn’t happen when you’re setting a scene. Think about your own internal monologue when you’re walking your self through a specific task. You’ll probably notice that most of those words don’t come up, right?

I’ve only given a few examples I’ve found in my own work and also on the interwebs. (Thanks Interwebs!) There are a ton more out there. Technically, anything that you use excessively or could completely remove from a sentence without changing the meaning could be considered a crutch word.

OH! DID YOU SEE WHAT I DID THERE?

Technically, anything you use excessively or could completely remove from a sentence…

Did I need to say technically? Did you understand the sentence MORE because I used the word technically?  Probably not. My brain was just stalling because I hadn’t decided on my next sentence. When I blog, I type like I would speak to you. My speech is riddled with crutch words and hesitations. RIDDLED, I tell you!

My own crutch words change from book to book. Also based on my mood at the time. For one of my very first books, I’d always have my characters doing something now. I didn’t catch that. My editor did, and she was like, “Umm. You used now 734590 times in this chapter. Please address.”

So how do you identify and eradicate the dreaded crutch words?

Writing programs like Scrivener help with that. There are a ton of word count analysis programs out there. They let you look at your word count by word. If you’re not willing to shell out, there are websites that also do it for free. I don’t feel comfortable with uploading my words to a website, but it’s an option if you are.

More food for thought. Until next week, my lovely readers!

xoxox,

Michelle