United States names suspect in Vault 7 leaks, but unable to file charges

Share

Last week, Schulte's lawyer, Sabrina Shroff, told a court that a deadline should be set for the government to file charges on the allegation that he was behind the Central Intelligence Agency leaks.

The leak may have dealt a serious blow to the intelligence agency's operations by exposing the CIA's playbook when it came to hacking computers, phones and smart TVs.

At January's pre-trial hearing for Schulte, Laroche said the material was taken from the CIA during the over six years that Schulte worked for the agency in various positions, including technical development officer.

The Post reports that federal prosecutors obtained a search warrant a year ago for personal computers and hand-written notes from Schulte's apartment, but that investigators didn't find any evidence linking Schulte to the disclosure. Court papers suggest he was aware of encrypted images of children existing on the server.

In September, a month after his arrest, Schulte was released on the condition he not leave New York City, where he had been living with a relative.

The software engineer, who denies the charges, is now being held in a Manhattan jail after violating his bail terms.

US Monitor Says N. Korea is Dismantling its Nuclear Test Site
North Korean state media reported over the weekend that the country had scheduled the dismantlement of its nuclear bomb site for later in May.

He was then tossed back in jail in December after prosecutors found evidence that he had broken those rules, and he has been held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan since then, according to the paper's report.

Schulte said he had also been planning a vacation with his brother to Cancun, Mexico, which may have given the appearance that he was trying to flee the country. It is not clear whether the government is pursuing contractors as part of the leak investigation, but prosecutors have not mentioned anyone other than Schulte in court proceedings.

"Due to these unfortunate coincidences the Federal Bureau of Investigation ultimately made the snap judgment that I was guilty of the leaks and targeted me", Schulte said.

"This case has been dragging since August 2017", Shroff told The Times. 'The government should be required to indict so Mr. Schulte has the opportunity to defend himself. Otherwise he is just languishing'. Prosecutors said in court last week they plan to file a new indictment in the next 45 days, according to the Times.

At the time of the leaks a year ago, the CIA released a sombre statement: "The American public should be deeply troubled by any WikiLeaks disclosure created to damage the Intelligence Community's ability to protect America against terrorists and other adversaries". Since then, he has posted a series of essays under a pseudonym on Facebook criticising the United States justice system.

Share